Phonograph Cocktail Bars

History. Rehabilitated.

The first phonographs were developed in the late 1800s, coming into their own in the early 1900s. One of the very earliest forms of this technology was developed here in the USA by Thomas Edison, with the ground-breaking Edison Gramaphone. Subsequently the technology evolved and grew - in size, richness of sound and market reach. By the late 1930s when radio began to dominate, an amazing variety of phonographs were available. Sadly these machines are old and rarely used any more, with most of their records only able to hold a single track per side. 

Yet they are a beautiful part of music history, and a the distinct sound of a scratchy old record playing on a century old phonograph instantly takes you back in time. 

Rather than let these beautiful pieces of history gather dust and slowly decay in the attic, we collect them and turn them into cocktail bars. Part of our process involves restoring the felt on the turn tables, securing the needle head and wheel arm and ensuring these visible aspects of their music heritage is protected for decades to come. The gorgeous wooden casings of the phonographs are then carefully restored to bring the wood back to its former glory, while internally they are upgraded to become well thought-out and highly functional cocktail bars. 

Most importantly, we scour the internet to find the history of each piece, its manufacturer and vintage. And where we can, we also include the history of the original owner of the phonograph. One such piece is the glorious mahogany phonograph, named in honor of Great Aunt Helen

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Great Aunt Helen

Dates to 1915

Named in honor of her first owner, Great Aunt Helen, this phonograph is a top of the line Victrola Model VV-XIV.

The Earl Fuller

Dates to 1915-1917

This American made phonograph dates to around 1915-1917 and is named in honor of a popular jazz band of that era.